‘The Devoted Friend’ by Oscar Wilde: Summary and Analysis

 

By Dr Oliver Tearle

‘The Devoted Friend’ is one of the fairy tales for children written by the Irish author Oscar Wilde (1854-1900). It was published in the 1888 collection The Happy Prince and Other Tales. ‘The Devoted Friend’ is about a Miller named Hugh, who professes to be devoted to his friend Hans, but in actual fact he uses Hans and insists on his performing endless favours for him without Hugh giving anything back in return. Continue reading “‘The Devoted Friend’ by Oscar Wilde: Summary and Analysis”

‘Each Man Kills the Thing He Loves’: Meaning and Origin

 

By Dr Oliver Tearle

Oscar Wilde (1854-1900) gave us many memorable lines. The majority of these are one-liners and witticisms which he either used in conversation or sprinkled throughout his clever comedies – his plays which were performed to great acclaim during the first half of the 1890s. But ‘each man kills the thing he loves’ is a little different, as we discover when we delve into the origins of this particular Wildean quotation. Continue reading “‘Each Man Kills the Thing He Loves’: Meaning and Origin”

‘There Is No Such Thing As a Moral or Immoral Book’: Meaning and Origin

 

By Dr Oliver Tearle

In 1890, Oscar Wilde’s The Picture of Dorian Gray was serialised in Lippincott’s Magazine. The following year, when the novel was published in book form, Wilde added a famous ‘Preface’ which consisted of a series of statements and axioms about literature and art. Continue reading “‘There Is No Such Thing As a Moral or Immoral Book’: Meaning and Origin”